Featured Speakers

Alan AbrhamsonAlan Abrahamson has covered the Olympics full time since 1998. He is an award-winning sportswriter, best-selling author and in-demand television analyst. In 2010 he launched his own website, 3 Wire Sports (www.3wiresports.com), described in James Patterson and Mark Sullivan’s 2012 best-selling novel “Private Games” as “the world’s best source of information about the [Olympic] Games and the culture that surrounds them.”
Session: “The Olympics: more than every four years”


Matthew S. BajkoMatthew S. Bajko is an assistant editor at the Bay Area Reporter, the country’s oldest continuously publishing LGBT newspaper. He also writes the paper’s political column, started by gay political pioneer Harvey Milk, covering the Bay Area and California’s LGBT political scene. He can also be heard on Sirius Satellite Radio as a correspondent for “Out QNews.”
Session: “All the news: telling the LGBT story”


Joe BergantinoJoe Bergantino is the director and senior investigative reporter of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. Bergantino has been a national and local investigative reporter for almost 30 years. He spent most of his career as the I-Team reporter for WBZ-TV in Boston. He also did investigative reporting for WPLG-TV in Miami and spent five years as a correspondent for ABC News.
Session: “Investigative reporting for high school newspapers”


Eric BurseEric Burse is a senior at the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California. Burse is double majoring in broadcast and digital journalism and political science. He is a reporter on campus for Annenberg TV News (ATVN), a contributor at the Daily Trojan newspaper, and an intern at “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams.” The National Association of Black Journalists recently recognized him as its 2012 Student Journalist of the Year.
Session: “Building your personal brand in journalism”


John DiazJohn Diaz has been The San Francisco Chronicle’s editorial page editor since 1996. He has won numerous state and national awards during his tenure and served as a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes in 2001 and 2002. Diaz started at The Chronicle in 1990 as an assistant city editor and later directed the paper’s East Bay news coverage. Before that he worked for The Denver Post, The Associated Press in Philadelphia and Donrey Media Group’s Washington, D.C. bureau.
Session: “The future of newspapers”


Kevin FaganKevin Fagan is a veteran reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle, specializing in enterprise news-feature writing and breaking news. From 2003 to 2006, he was the only beat reporter in the United States covering homelessness full-time. Fagan produced more than 200 high-impact dailies and packages that helped drive city and national policy, comparing housing and counseling programs in the Bay Area and throughout the nation. He has been nominated nine times for the Pulitzer Prize for stories ranging from homelessness to disaster coverage.
Session: “Telling the city’s untold stories”


David GreeneDavid Greene is First Amendment and media lawyer with Bryan Cave LLP, which he joined after serving for over a decade as executive director and counsel for First Amendment Project, a nonprofit organization concentrating on free speech and free press issues. Greene is an adjunct professor at University of San Francisco School of Law and an instructor in the journalism department at San Francisco State University.
Session: “The Hazelwood decision 25 years later”


Félix GutiérrezFélix Gutiérrez is a professor of journalism and of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.  In 2011, he received the Lionel C. Barrow Jr. Award for Distinguished Achievement in Diversity Research and Education.  His work concerns racial diversity and media, including working on the upcoming documentary, “Voices for Justice: More Than 200 Years of Latino Newspapers in the U.S.”
Session: “‘Voices of Justice’: 200 years of Latino newspapers”


Burt HermanBurt Herman is an entrepreneurial journalist who is working to combine the worlds of journalism and technology to build the future of media. He is co-founder of Storify, which builds tools for journalists, bloggers and anyone to make stories by curating the social Web. He also is co-founder of Hacks/Hackers, an international nonprofit organization that brings together journalists and technologists to collaborate on projects. As a bureau chief and correspondent for The Associated Press, he covered politics, conflict, culture and business across the United States, Europe, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.
Session: “Everybody’s a reporter, but not a journalist”


Richard Koci-HernandezRichard Koci-Hernandez is an Emmy Award-winning visual journalist who worked as a photographer at the San Jose Mercury News. His work has appeared in Time, Newsweek, USA Today, The New York Times and international magazines. His work for the Mercury News has earned him two Pulitzer Prize nominations.
Session: “Mobile reporting”


Kim KomenichKim Komenich is an assistant professor for new media studies at San Jose State University. Previously, he worked as a staff photographer and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Francisco Examiner. Komenich was awarded the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography for his photographs of the Philippine Revolution. He has earned other awards for his work: the Military Reporters and Editors’ Association’s Photography Award; the Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists; the World Press Photo News Picture Story Award; three National Headliner Awards; and the Clifton C. Edom Education Award. In October he received the SPJ Journalism Innovation Award for his interactive website “Revolution Revisited” which was produced by graduate students at the University of Miami School of Communication.is an assistant professor for new media studies at San Jose State University. Previously, he worked as a staff photographer and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Francisco Examiner. Komenich was awarded the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography for photographs of the Philippine Revolution. He has earned other awards for his work: the Military Reporters and Editors’ Association’s Photography Award; the Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists; the World Press Photo News Picture Story Award; three National Headliner Awards; and the Clifton C. Edom Education Award.
Session: To come


Carla MarinucciCarla Marinucci is the award-winning senior political writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, where she has covered national and state politics for the paper since 1996. Marinucci has covered four presidential elections and three California gubernatorial elections. She has written on a wide range of political issues, including immigration, abortion and education, and has also appeared on CNN and MSNBC.
Session: “Covering the politics beat”


Dori J. MaynardDori J. Maynard is the president of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, the oldest organization dedicated to helping the nation’s news media accurately, fairly and credibly portray all segments of our society. The Institute has trained thousands of journalists of color, including the national editor of the Washington Post and the only Latina to edit a major metropolitan newspaper.
Session: “Adding diversity to your newsroom”


Thomas PeeleThomas Peele is an investigative reporter for the Bay Area News Group and author of “Killing the Messenger, A Story of Radical Faith, Racism’s Backlash and the Assassination of a Journalist,” a critically-acclaimed nonfiction book about race, the Black Muslim movement and the 2007 murder of journalist Chauncey Bailey. Bailey was the first American reporter killed in-country to stop publication of a story since 1976.
Session: “Killing the messenger, a reporter gunned down”


Mia QuagliarelloMia Quagliarello is the head curator at Flipboard, the world’s first social magazine. Before joining Flipboard, she was YouTube’s first editorial/community manager. Quagliarello also has worked at Apple as iTunes’ editorial manager for video and Rhapsody as managing editor. She started her career as a copywriter at MTV Networks. She holds degrees from NYU and the University of Pennsylvania.
Session: “Flipboard for student journalists”


Michelle QuinnMichelle Quinn is a technology reporter for POLITICO, covering the intersection of technology, policy and politics. She has worked at the Los Angeles Times, the San Jose Mercury News and the San Francisco Chronicle.
Session: “POLITICO and the opportunity in online media”


Martin ReynoldsMartin Reynolds is senior editor for community engagement for the Bay Area News Group. He began his career at the Oakland Tribune as a Chips Quinn Scholar intern in 1995 and worked his way through the ranks, serving as editor-in-chief from 2007 to 2011. He was a lead editors on the award-winning Chauncey Bailey Project investigating a Tribune reporter’s assassination and for the award-winning  “Not Just a Number” project examining youth violence in Oakland. He is co-founder of the Tribune’s Oakland Voices project, a community journalism program.
Session: “Becoming your community’s storyteller”


Robert RosenthalRobert Rosenthal is the executive director of the Center for Investigative Reporting. He is an award-winning journalist. He has been a foreign correspondent in Africa and the Middle East, and he was the managing editor of The San Francisco Chronicle and the editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer. He said his work today, at CIR, is the most challenging, rewarding and important of his career.
Session: “The future and value of investigative reporting in a democracy”


Brant WardBrant Ward has been a San Francisco Chronicle staff photographer for more than two decades. Ward joined the paper after working two years at the Petaluma Argus Courier and a stint as a reporter for the Point Reyes Light. He has covered stories in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Somalia, but stories closer to home are a favorite of the Bay Area native. In 2003 Ward and reporter Kevin Fagan began a three-year project on the plight of the homeless. More recently Ward documented a family in Chinatown struggling with the tough economic times.
Session: “Telling the city’s untold stories”


Karen WickreKaren Wickre is editorial director at Twitter, developing the company’s voice and content strategy. She has worked the editorial side of publishing for more than 20 years as an editor, author, columnist and content strategist. Previously, Wickre worked at Google, for which she developed the company’s long-term corporate content strategy.
Session: “A (student) journalist’s guide to Twitter”


Sen. Leland YeeSen. Leland Yee has served in the California State Senate since 2006. During his tenure in the Legislature, Sen. Yee has fought for children, mental health services, working families, seniors, education, open government, consumer protection, civil rights and the environment. He has been honored with dozens of awards for his work, including JEA’s Friend of Scholastic Journalism Award in 2009 for sponsoring Senate Bill 1370, which was passed into law and protects high school and college teachers and other employees from retaliation by administrators as a result of student speech.
Session: “Protecting and expanding student press rights”